DNR: Marc Duplass’ narcissism is caring a dead movie around. Creep 2 – movie review

Following the unexpected success of Creep (2014), Mark Duplass reprises his role in this sequel in which the titular creep in search of new victims.

Creep 2 2Older and more tired than in the first film, Aaron (Duplass) is now sick of his “dream job” as a serial killer, thus he gets in contact with Sara (Desiree Akhavan), a YouTuber documentarist whose channel about weirdos she met on the internet is stuck with low ratings and even lower numbers. Continue reading “DNR: Marc Duplass’ narcissism is caring a dead movie around. Creep 2 – movie review”

The Blackcoat’s Daughter (2017) EXPLAINED.

I’ve been waiting to write this since the moment I got to the end of Oz Perkins’ The Blackcoat’s Daughter!

Blackcoat's Daughter 1If you haven’t seen the movie and are wondering why I should focus my attention on a motion picture that grossed only $20,435 worldwide, check out my spoiler-free take on the movie, since I’m now about to spoil the hell out of this complex film in the next few paragraphs. Continue reading “The Blackcoat’s Daughter (2017) EXPLAINED.”

Twin Peaks: The Return pushes the ‘Lynchometer’ too high. TV series review

Twin Peaks is, arguably, the best TV show ever made. Mind you, it’s not my favourite – even though season 2 is among the closest ones to my heart – but its influence on quality TV shows is undeniable. As undeniable are its own values.

Twin Peaks 1At the beginning of the 90s, the first two seasons of this iconic TV show had revolutionised the language of modern TV series with the story of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) investigating the murder of homecoming queen Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) in the fictional town of Twin Peaks, Washington.

Continue reading “Twin Peaks: The Return pushes the ‘Lynchometer’ too high. TV series review”

One giant built-up to a clever twist. Lake Bo(re)dom – movie review

It’s not a very smart pun, I know. Obviously, the real title of this Finnish horror thriller is Lake Bodom, a movie that came out in 2016 but had its wide release in 2017.

Regarded as one of the smartest horror films in recent years, Lake Bodom utilises an actual crime case that happened in the location of the same name in 1960, when two youngsters got stabbed to death. Following the investigation, a third 18-year-old boy who was in the tent with the victims was found innocent for lack of evidence.

In consequence, the movie revolves around four high-schoolers (two boys and two girls) who go camping in the same location some 40 years after the murders to find out if the Lake Bodom killer is just a legend or something more real. Continue reading “One giant built-up to a clever twist. Lake Bo(re)dom – movie review”

Bunnyman: Vengeance, The Limehouse Golem and Resurrection – movie reviews in short

The end is coming! No, don’t worry, I’m only talking about the end of 2017, which is quickly approaching and… there are still so many horror flicks to check out and review!

Therefore, I decided to give you my brief take on three films that were recently released and might seem appealing to you. Bear in mind, these titles are all non-American (but only for Resurrection you will need to read subtitles), which is what has driven me to watch them in the first place. Continue reading “Bunnyman: Vengeance, The Limehouse Golem and Resurrection – movie reviews in short”

An unsettlingly bold combination between psychological and supernatural horror. The Blackcoat’s Daughter – movie review

Oz Perkins’ journey into the reimagination of horror sub-genres has led him to create The Blackcoat’s Daughter, originally released in 2015 under the name February and widely distributed a few months ago with the current title.

In 2016, Perkins had already raised some controversy with I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House, a 19th century period drama (I’d say) that twisted the “haunted house” sub-genre around and created quite some buzz. Continue reading “An unsettlingly bold combination between psychological and supernatural horror. The Blackcoat’s Daughter – movie review”

Between Let the Right One In and Raw. The Transfiguration – movie review

Transfiguration 1.1.jpgOutcast teenager with shady past and obscure life meets youngster who’s bullied and abused by a bunch of assholes. They team up, go through that stuff and grow up together.

No, guys, I’m not reviewing the ground-breaking Swedish horror drama Let the Right One In (2008). Instead, the one mentioned above is the storyline of The Transfiguration, a 2017 film written and directed by Michael O’Shea at his filmmaking debut. Continue reading “Between Let the Right One In and Raw. The Transfiguration – movie review”

The Classics of Horror #20 – The Sixth Sense (1999)

Once upon a time, M. Night Shyamalan was the most promising director in Hollywood, not just a meme to make fun of.

Mostly, said reputation came from a masterpiece that blew everybody’s mind in the late 90s: The Sixth Sense.

On one hand, I’m glad to conclude this six-month long series with a truly great film; on the other, though, reviewing one of my all-time favourite movies is a challenge that both stimulate and scare me.

The Sixth Sense tells the story of a broken children psychologist – Malcolm Crowe, played by Bruce Willis – who tries to help grade schooler Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment, nominated at the Awards for his supporting cast role) to overcome what appears to be some serious psychotic issue.

The Sixth Sense 1Before “post horror” became a thing (is it really?), M. Night created a universe that gains credibility and strength from its combination of horror, drama, thriller and mystery. The balance between these sub-genres, perfectly blended together, makes for a unique viewing experience that has no precedes.

Continue reading “The Classics of Horror #20 – The Sixth Sense (1999)”

Birthdays have never been so dreadfully terrible. Happy Death Day – movie review

HDD 1Theresa “Tree” Gelbman wakes up hangover for her birthday, in the room of a classmate she spent the night with, and, after being the biggest bitch on earth throughout the day, she’s lured into a tunnel where she is murdered by a hooded figure wearing a mask of the campus mascot. Continue reading “Birthdays have never been so dreadfully terrible. Happy Death Day – movie review”